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Out Stealing Horses - Per Petterson; Translated by Anne BornSee larger image
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Out Stealing Horses



Awards: International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award - Winner; The Independent (UK) Foreign Fiction Prize Shortlist; The Independent (UK) Foreign Fiction Prize Winner; Best Translated Book Award Finalist

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About The Author

Per PettersonPer Petterson

PER PETTERSON has written five novels, which have established his reputation as one of Norway’s best fiction writers. Out Stealing Horses won the Norwegian Booksellers Prize, the Critics Award for best novel, and the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize.

photo: Torunn Momtazi

Awards

International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award - Winner
The Independent (UK) Foreign Fiction Prize Shortlist
The Independent (UK) Foreign Fiction Prize Winner
Best Translated Book Award Finalist

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Discussion Questions

1. “I needed to concentrate,” Trond says at the start of the book (pg. 7), explaining his decision to

move to the country. Do you think he is happy in his isolation? Is he making a brave choice by

withdrawing to the country, as he has always dreamt of doing; or do you think he’s fleeing the

responsibilities of his life?

2. Soon after Odd is killed, Trond says “I felt it somewhere inside me; a small remnant, a bright

yellow speck that perhaps would never leave me.” What is it he feels? How does that day

stealing horses with Jon, and learning what has happened to Odd, change Trond? Do you see the

effects of that loss in him as an older man?

3. Petterson has been widely praised for his descriptions of nature, and of small quiet moments in

everyday life. How does his writing make these ordinary moments compelling? Which images of

landscapes or domestic scenes remained most vivid in your memory after finishing the book?

4. After his dream at the start of Chapter 5, which leaves him weeping, Trond says, “But then it

is not death I fear.” Do you believe him? If so, what is he afraid of?

5. How do you think Trond’s life would have changed if he had hit the man in Karlstad (pp. 231-

233)? Why does he attach so much significance to that decision?

6. Look at the scene in which Trond’s car goes off the road and he sees the lynx in the woods

(pg. 65). At the end of the scene, Trond says “I can’t recall when I last felt so alive as when I got

the car onto the road again and drove on.” Why does a near accident, and the sight of the lynx,

thrill him?

7. Were you surprised by Ellen’s reaction to her father when she finds him at the end of the

book? Would you be angrier in her position, or more forgiving? Has Trond been unfair to her?

8. How has Trond become like his father, and how has he managed to take a different path?

What parallels do you see between the lives they lead in the book? How is Trond’s behavior as

an adult influenced by the short time he spent with his father as a young man?

9. Look at the book’s final section, after Trond has discovered that his father isn’t coming back.

How does his behavior change? Were you surprised by his reaction to the news?

10. How do you think Trond’s life will change after the end of the novel? Will he see more of his

daughter? Will he and Lars become friends, or will he return to the isolation he had sought out

when he moved to the country?

11. Look at Ellen’s monologue about the opening lines of David Copperfield (pg. 197). How do

you understand the phenomenon she’s describing, of not being “the leading characters of our

own lives”? Has this happened to anyone you know? Do you think it has happened to Trond? Is

it a good or a bad thing?

12. Why do you think Trond’s father doesn’t tell him the story of the Resistance? Why does he

leave it to Franz? How do you think Trond’s perception of his father would have changed if his

father had told the story himself?

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