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The Collected Stories of Deborah Eisenberg




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Praise for The Collected Stories of Deborah Eisenberg

“Eisenberg conveys her acutely self-conscious characters’ interiority with a Woolf-like grain, though with startling humor.”
The New York Times Book Review (Editors’ Choice)

“For the past month, Deborah Eisenberg has slowly brought my reading habit to a surprising standstill. I dove into this fat, wonderful collection like a man in a hot dog eating contest. No one writes the kind of strange, deeply intuitive short story that Eisenberg writes. You wouldn’t know it from the heft of this volume, but she doesn’t write them very often either. Maybe a story a year. So very quickly I began forcing myself to put the book aside. I’d stop to look at her author photo. Anything to slow down the moment when there were no more left…. Eisenberg is America’s poet laureate of neuroses, a blackly comedic metaphysician of altered states.”
—John Freeman, Barnes & Noble Review 

“One of America’s finest storytellers has been anthologized: The Collected Stories of Deborah Eisenberg (Picador) locates elegant symmetries in uncertain lives navigating uncertain times.”
VOGUE.com 

“Sarcastic, self-aware, and often wickedly funny…. Perhaps the most compelling aspect of Eisenberg’s stories is the ease with which she captures the fearful excitement of being human, and our reluctance to acknowledge how little our circumstances have to do with our own decisions.”
—Rachael Brown, TheAtlantic.com 

“An unflinching examination of the human heart…. William Faulkner contended that there is one, and only one, subject worth writing about: the human heart in conflict with itself…. In the years since Faulkner’s proclamation, no writer has concerned herself more explicitly or precisely with the complexities of human emotion than Deborah Eisenberg…. [She] has, in four astonishing collections of short fiction now brought together in a single volume, The Collected Stories of Deborah Eisenberg, sought to excavate people’s most complex and secret feelings, ‘mental states…that are just on the border of expressible.’… to compare [her work] is to reduce it, and yet at its best her lucid but rambling narrative melancholia recalls all at once the passion of Anita Brookner, the furious remove of Jean Rhys, the detached abstraction of David Foster Wallace, the deft compression of Alice Munro and, occasionally, the downbeat, absurdist humor of Lorrie Moore.”
—Maud Newton on NPR.org 

“If you haven’t discovered Deborah Eisenberg’s beautifully crafted short stories, this is a good choice, because you will want to read and reread them all. These stories are rich and delicate, and linger in the memory to shift and amplify their values. Eisenberg’s subtle, intelligent observations put readers in the best company.”
—Prairie Lights Bookstore

“What is it like to be a genius? Ask Deborah Eisenberg. The question is not as hyperbolic as it might seem; last year, Eisenberg was awarded a MacArthur fellowship, usually referred to as a ‘Genius Grant’. If that award served to spotlight Eisenberg’s achievement as one of America’s foremost writers of fiction, this new volume of collected stories confirms it, illustrating that over the past 25 years Eisenberg has become better and better at the things at which, 25 years ago, she was already something of a master….”
—Belinda McKeon, Irish Times 

“This season, I chose four books of stories to read and recommend. At the top of my list—and highly recommended—is The Collected Stories of Deborah Eisenberg.”
—Ann LaFarge, Hudson Valley News