Native American Fiction A User's Manual

David Treuer

Graywolf Press

155597452X

9781555974527

224 Pages

$15.00

CAD17.00

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Rather than create a comprehensive cultural and historical genealogy for Native American literature, David Treuer investigates a selection of the most important Native American novels and, with a novelist's eye and a critic's mind, examines the intricate process of understanding literature on its own terms.

Native American Fiction: A User's Manual is speculative, witty, engaging, and written for the inquisitive reader. These essays—on Sherman Alexie, Forrest Carter, James Fenimore Cooper, Louise Erdrich, Leslie Marmon Silko, and James Welch—are rallying cries for the need to read literature as literature and, ultimately, reassert the importance and primacy of the word.

REVIEWS

Praise for Native American Fiction

"In these crisp, sharp-edged essays David Treuer dares to question the usefulness, let alone the validity, of the term, 'Native American Fiction.'"—Alan Trachtenberg, author of the Francis Parkman Prize-winning Shades of Hiawatha
 
"Native American Fiction: A User's Manual convincingly questions the validity of the debates of authenticity that have surrounded discussions of Indian literature. David Treuer's book is likely to become the manifesto of a new generation of Native American writers and critics and will be of interest to readers of literature anywhere."—Werner Sollors, author of Ethnicity, Theories of Ethnicity, and The Invention of Ethnicity

Reviews from Goodreads

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BOOK EXCERPTS

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DAVID TREUER is Ojibwe from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota. He is the award-winning author of two previous novels, Little and The Hiawatha. He teaches literature and creative writing at the University
of Minnesota.
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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

  • David Treuer

  • David Treuer is Ojibwe from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota. He is the award-winning author of three previous books: Little, The Hiawatha, and The Translation of Dr Apelles. He teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Minnesota.
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