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The Seagull A Play

Anton Chekhov; A New Version by Tom Stoppard

Faber & Faber

057119270X

9780571192700

Trade Paperback

96 Pages

$14.00

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The Seagull, a spectacular failure on its first appearance, was the play that, on its second, established Anton Chekhov as an important and revolutionary dramatist. Here, amid the weariness of life in the country, the famous actress Arkadina presides over a household riven with desperate love, with dreams of success and dread of failure. It is her son, Konstantin, who one day shoots a seagull; it is the novelist Trigorin who will one day write the story of the seagull so casually killed; but it is Nina, the seagull herself, whose life to come will rewrite the story.

This new translation of The Seagull—made by Tom Stoppard for the Peter Hall Company at the Old Vic in 1997—was produced by The Public Theater/New York Shakespeare Festival in New York City in 2001. The volume also contains an Introduction by Stoppard that indicates some of the problems translators have faced since the first English language Seagull in 1909

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"This is Chekov played with lightness, irony, and speed."—The Guardian

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BOOK EXCERPTS

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Anton Chekov was born in 1860 in a small town on the Sea of Azov. His plays include Ivanov, Platonov, Uncle Vanya, On the High Road, and The Proposal, among others. As he was beginning to gain international recognition as a major dramatist, he suffered two heart attacks and died in Badenweiler, Germany.

Tom Stoppard's other work includes Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (Tony Award), Jumpers, Travesties (Tony Award), Night and Day, After Margritte, The Real Thing (Tony Award), Enter a Free Man, Hapgood, Arcadia (Evening Standard Award, The Oliver Award and the Critics Award), Indian
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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

  • Anton Chekhov; A New Version by Tom Stoppard

  • Anton Chekov was born in 1860 in a small town on the Sea of Azov. His plays include Ivanov, Platonov, Uncle Vanya, On the High Road, and The Proposal, among others. As he was beginning to gain international recognition as a major dramatist, he suffered two heart attacks and died in Badenweiler, Germany.

    Tom Stoppard's other work includes Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (Tony Award), Jumpers, Travesties (Tony Award), Night and Day, After Margritte, The Real Thing (Tony Award), Enter a Free Man, Hapgood, Arcadia (Evening Standard Award, The Oliver Award and the Critics Award), Indian Ink (a stage adaptation of his own play, In the Native State) and The Invention of Love.
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