Macmillan Childrens Publishing Group
A Woman's Crusade

A Woman's Crusade

Alice Paul and the Battle for the Ballot

Mary Walton

St. Martin's Griffin

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Alice Paul began her life as a studious girl from a strict Quaker family in New Jersey. In 1907, a scholarship took her to England, where she developed a passionate devotion to the suffrage movement. Upon her return to the United States, Alice became the leader of the militant wing of the American suffrage movement. Calling themselves "Silent Sentinels," she and her followers were the first protesters to picket the White House. Arrested and jailed, they went on hunger strikes and were force-fed and brutalized. Years before Gandhi's campaign of nonviolent resistance, and decades before civil rights demonstrations, Alice Paul practiced peaceful civil disobedience in the pursuit of equal rights for women.

With her daring and unconventional tactics, Alice Paul eventually succeeded in forcing President Woodrow Wilson and a reluctant U.S. Congress to pass the Nineteenth Amendment, granting women the right to vote. Here at last is the inspiring story of the young woman whose dedication to women's rights made that long-held dream a reality.

"Alice Paul was a visionary and a pioneer. Her struggle for women's rights was built on the premise that no society or nation can reach its full potential if half of the population is left behind." -- Hillary Rodham Clinton

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About the author

Mary Walton

Mary Walton is a veteran journalist who wrote for the Philadelphia Inquirer for twenty years. The acclaimed author of several books including For Love of Money and Car: A Drama of the American Workplace, she lives in Ocean Grove, NJ.

Mary Walton

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St. Martin's Griffin

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