To Have and To Kill

Nurse Melanie McGuire, an Illicit Affair, and the Gruesome Murder of Her Husband

John Glatt

St. Martin's True Crime

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One by one, three waterlogged suitcases were pulled from the Chesapeake Bay. In each were body parts of a man. In a forensics room, the truth was discovered: William McGuire had been horribly murdered and dismembered.

William and his loving wife, a registered nurse named Melanie, had just closed on their New Jersey dream home. Little did William know about the nightmare that was in store… For Melanie had been involved in a long-term affair with a married doctor at the fertility clinic where she worked—and she had plans for the future that didn’t include William.

Investigators believe that on April 29, 2004, Melanie first drugged her husband, then murdered him in cold blood. Three years after America witnessed the details of the suitcase incident unfold—on 48 Hours, Dateline NBC, and ABC Primetime, and in People magazine, among other news outlets—Melanie was convicted of first-degree murder and desecrating human remains. To Have and to Kill is the true story of a marriage that turned deadly…

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  PART ONEVirginia BeachPROLOGUEWednesday, May 5, 2004

It was a welcome day off for Chris Henkle, who had a long-standing arrangement to go fishing with his friend Dee Connors. Early May is the start of the spring trophy fishing season in the Chesapeake Bay, with rock fish, striped bass and perch, and the burly Virginia Beach fireman rose at the crack of dawn.At 5:45 a.m. he arrived at Connors’ house, finding him already waiting outside with his young son Sam and daughter Claire, excited to be going on their first fishing trip.

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About the Author

John Glatt

English-born John Glatt is the author of Lost and Found, Secrets in the Cellar, Playing with Fire, and many other bestselling books of true crime. He has more than 30 years of experience as an investigative journalist in England and America. Glatt left school at 16 and worked a variety of jobs—including tea boy and messenger—before joining a small weekly newspaper. He freelanced at several English newspapers, then in 1981 moved to New York, where he joined the staff for News Limited and freelanced for publications including Newsweek and the New York Post. His first book, a biography of Billy Graham, was published in 1981, and he published For I Have Sinned, his first book of true crime, in 1998. He has appeared on television and radio programs all over the world, including Dateline NBC, Fox News, A Current Affair, BBC World News, and A&E Biography. He and his wife Gail divide their time between New York City, the Catskill Mountains and London.

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Available Formats and Book Details

To Have and To Kill
Nurse Melanie McGuire, an Illicit Affair, and the Gruesome Murder of Her Husband
John Glatt

e-Book Agency

e-Book Agency
St. Martin's Press
St. Martin's True Crime
December 2008
e-Book Agency
ISBN: 9781429997607
ISBN10: 1429997605
384 pages, Includes eight pages of photographs
$7.99

Mass Market Paperbound

Mass Market Paperbound
St. Martin's Press
St. Martin's True Crime
December 2008
Mass Market Paperbound
ISBN: 9780312941666
ISBN10: 0312941668
4 3/16 x 6 3/4 inches, 384 pages, Includes 8 pages of photographs
$7.99

Trade Paperback

Trade Paperback
St. Martin's Press
St. Martin's Griffin
December 2008
Trade Paperback
ISBN: 9781250025876
ISBN10: 1250025877
384 pages, Includes 8 pages of photographs
$22.99
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St. Martin's True Crime

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