OVERRIDE

Man in the Shadows

Inside the Middle East Crisis with a Man Who Led the Mossad

Efraim Halevy

St. Martin's Press

Israel’s Mossad is thought by many to be one of the most powerful intelligence agencies in the world. In Man in the Shadows, Efraim Halevy—a Mossad officer since 1961 and its chief between 1998 and 2002—provides an unprecedented portrait of the Middle East crisis. Having served as the secret envoy of prime ministers Rabin, Shamir, Netanyahu, Barak, and Sharon, Halevy was privy to many of the top-level negotiations that determined the progress of the region’s struggle for peace during the years when the threat of Islamic terror became increasingly powerful. Informed by his extraordinary access, he writes candidly about the workings of the Mossad, the prime ministers he served under, and the other major players on the international stage: Yasir Arafat, Saddam Hussein, Hafiz al-Assad, Mu’amar Gadhafi, Bill Clinton, George H. W. Bush, and George W. Bush. From the vantage point of a chief in charge of a large organization, he frankly describes the difficulty of running an intelligence agency in a time when heads of state are immersed, as never before, in using intelligence to protect their nations while, at the same time, acting to protect themselves politically. Most important, he writes fiercely and without hesitation about how the world might achieve peace in the face of the growing threat from Islamic terrorist organizations.
In this gripping inside look, Halevy opens his private dossier on events past and present: the assassination attempt by the Mossad on the life of Khaled Mashal, now the leader of Khammas; the negotiations surrounding the Israeli-Jordan Peace Accord and its importance for the stability of the region; figures in the CIA, like Jim Angleton and George Tenet, with whom he worked (Halevy even shares his feelings about Tenet’s abrupt resignation). He tells the truth about what the Mossad really knew before 9/11. He writes candidly about assessing the threat of the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction in the region and beyond, and what this spells for the future of international stability and survival. He touches on the increasing visibility of the CIA in the Middle East and openly shares his misgivings about both the report of the 9/11 Commission and the Middle East road map to peace that was pressed on all sides of the conflict by the U.S. government. He looks at the terrorist attacks in Madrid and London and their far-reaching effects, and states the unthinkable: We have yet to see the worst of what the radical Islamic terrorists are capable of.

Sure to be one of the year’s most talked-about books, this fierce and intelligent account of will be a must-read for those looking to hear from a man who wielded his influence, in the shadows, to save the Middle East and the world from a never-ending cycle of violence and destruction.


BOOK EXCERPTS

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Chapter One

The End of the Eight-Year War
(1988--1989)

The Iran-Iraq war was nearing its end. Iraq was employing nonconventional means both to stem the tide of the Iranian-Shiite onslaught and to cow Kurdish resistance from within. For close to eight years Israel had been sitting on the fence and observing the Sunni-Shiite confrontation with considerable satisfaction. The mutual weakening of Iraq and Iran, both sworn enemies of Israel, had been serving Israel's strategic interests for quite some time and had contributed to the decline of the eastern front threat that had been a
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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

  • Efraim Halevy

  • Efraim Halevy, the former head of the Mossad, is now the Head of the Center for Strategic and Policy Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He was also Israel's ambassador to the European Union between 1996 and 1998.

  • Efraim Halevy © Israel Haramati
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Man in the Shadows

Inside the Middle East Crisis with a Man Who Led the Mossad

Efraim Halevy

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St. Martin's Press

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