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Competition

The Birth of a New Science

James Case

Hill and Wang

The Mathematical Theory of Games Sheds Light On A Wide Range of Competitive Activities
 
What do chess-playing computer programs, biological evolution, competitive sports, gambling, alternative voting systems, public auctions, corporate globalization, and class warfare have in common? All are manifestations of a new paradigm in scientific thinking, which James Case calls "the emerging science of competition." Drawing in part on the pioneering work of mathematicians such as John von Neumann, John Nash (of A Beautiful Mind fame), and Robert Axelrod, Case explores the common game-theoretical strands that tie these seemingly unrelated fields together, showing how each can be better understood in the shared light of the others. Not since James Gleick's bestselling book Chaos brought widespread public attention to the new sciences of chaos and complexity has a general-interest science book served such an eye-opening purpose. Competition will appeal to a wide range of readers, from policy wonks and futurologists to former jocks and other ordinary citizens seeking to make sense of a host of novel--and frequently controversial--issues.

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Competition
CHAPTER 1Man Versus MachineOn May 11, 1997, an IBM computer named Deep Blue defeated the reigning world chess champion in a six-game match. It was the first loss of Garry Kasparov's professional career and, with the possible exception of Bobby Fischer's victory over Boris Spassky in 1972, the most widely reported chess match in history. A pre-match press conference was attended by more than two hundred reporters from around the world, including TV crews from ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, Fox, and several foreign networks. As the match progressed, and the likelihood of a Deep Blue victory increased,
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REVIEWS

Praise for Competition

"James Case strikes at the heart of modern neoclassical analysis with this penetrating exploration of the reigning orthodoxy and the alternatives we need to consider. The implications for economic thought are startling. The implications for economic policy are stunning." --Louis Galambos, professor of history, Johns Hopkins University
 
"This is a superb introduction to the science of competition, whose roots lie in game theory.  James Case's book offers sophisticated insights into its historical origins, its mathematical foundations, and its applications, from chess to sports to elections to war.  He shows particularly how strategic choices in business and economics are much better understood in terms of game-theoretic ideas than the vaunted free market of orthodox economics." --Steven J. Brams, Department of Politics, New York University

"James Case demonstrates convincingly that competition does not quite function the way we were told in courses on the principles of economics. This book is a great read for anyone who wants to know how modern experimental economics and game theory can be used to call into question the dogma of mainstream economics." --Marc Lavoie, Department of Economics, University of Ottawa
 
"James Case's Competition builds to a knockout punch: antiquated economic theories are costing us billions in lost jobs, businesses, and pensions. The culprit is the ever-influential neoclassical economics, a house of cards barely supported by evidence and held up by ego and wishful thinking. Case lays out the sane alternative, an empirical science of competition based on the evidence of real people and real markets. This is a book that voters, leaders, and businesspeople ought to take seriously." --William Poundstone, author of Fortune's Formula

Reviews from Goodreads

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

  • James Case

  • James Case is a freelance writer and management consultant, with a particular interest in the application of higher mathematics, notably game theory, to economics and various other fields. He holds a PhD in mathematics from the University of Michigan.
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Competition

The Birth of a New Science

James Case

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FROM THE PUBLISHER

Hill and Wang

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