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Macmillan Childrens Publishing Group
The Arbornaut

The Arbornaut

A Life Discovering the Eighth Continent in the Trees Above Us

Meg Lowman; Foreword by Sylvia A. Earle

Farrar, Straus and Giroux

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Nicknamed the “Real-Life Lorax” by National Geographic, the botanist and conservationist Meg Lowman—aka “Canopy Meg”—takes us on an adventure into the eighth continent of the world's treetops, along her journey as a scientist, and into climate action

One of the world’s first tree-top scientists, Meg Lowman is as innovative as MacGuyver and as can-do as the Unsinkable Molly Brown. A pioneer in her field—she invented one of the first treetop walkways—she is a tireless advocate for the earth and has spent decades educating citizens across the globe. In a voice as infectious in its enthusiasm as in its practical optimism, The Arbornaut chronicles her irresistible story.

From climbing solo hundreds of feet into Australia's rainforests to measuring tree growth in the northeastern United States, from searching the redwoods of the Pacific coast for new life to studying leaf-eaters in Scotland's Highlands, from a bioblitz in Malaysia to conservation planning in India to collaborating with priests in Ethiopia's last forests—Lowman launches us into the life and work of a field scientist and ecologist. She also offers hope, specific plans, and recommendations for action; despite devastation across the world, we can still make an immediate and lasting impact against climate change. A blend of memoir and fieldwork, The Arbornaut is for fans of Hope Jahren’s Lab Girl and the work of E. O. Wilson, Jane Goodall, Robert MacFarlane, and Helen MacDonald.

Come live among scientists and travel the wo… More…

Nicknamed the “Real-Life Lorax” by National Geographic, the botanist and conservationist Meg Lowman—aka “Canopy Meg”—takes us on an adventure into the eighth continent of the world's treetops, along her journey as a scientist, and into climate action

One of the world’s first tree-top scientists, Meg Lowman is as innovative as MacGuyver and as can-do as the Unsinkable Molly Brown. A pioneer in her field—she invented one of the first treetop walkways—she is a tireless advocate for the earth and has spent decades educating citizens across the globe. In a voice as infectious in its enthusiasm as in its practical optimism, The Arbornaut chronicles her irresistible story.

From climbing solo hundreds of feet into Australia's rainforests to measuring tree growth in the northeastern United States, from searching the redwoods of the Pacific coast for new life to studying leaf-eaters in Scotland's Highlands, from a bioblitz in Malaysia to conservation planning in India to collaborating with priests in Ethiopia's last forests—Lowman launches us into the life and work of a field scientist and ecologist. She also offers hope, specific plans, and recommendations for action; despite devastation across the world, we can still make an immediate and lasting impact against climate change. A blend of memoir and fieldwork, The Arbornaut is for fans of Hope Jahren’s Lab Girl and the work of E. O. Wilson, Jane Goodall, Robert MacFarlane, and Helen MacDonald.

Come live among scientists and travel the world (even in a hot-air balloon)! The Arbornaut is the engrossing story of how a nerdy tree climber and the only girl at the science fair grew into an inspiring innovator and international leader.

Includes black-and-white illustrations

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Praise for The Arbornaut

"A passionate look at the 'unexplored wonderland' of trees... Lowman shines in her ability to combine accessible science with exciting personal anecdotes that effectively convey the 'thrill of aerial exploration' and bolster her case that trees—and sustainable ecosystems—are worth studying, protecting, and preserving. Nature lovers will find much to consider."
Publishers Weekly

"
The Arbornaut captures the magic of that little-known world with its pioneering stories and clear, informative text. Readers everywhere will be fascinated and inspired to learn more about nature, and especially about how we need to conserve the world’s forests.”
—Jane Goodall, PhD, DBE, founder of the Jane Goodall Institute, and United Nations Messenger of Peace

"The Arbornaut is about a shy girl who loved to play outdoors and became a scientist who educated the world about the abundant life in the treetops. I loved it.”
—Temple Grandin, author of Animals Make Us Human, Animals in Translation, and Thinking in Pictures

The Arbornaut is an eye-opening and enchanting book by one of our major scientist-explorers. Without Meg Lowman, we’d miss so many of the planet’s wonders that just happen to lie out of sight, in a realm we take for granted, ignore, or never knew about to begin with. Lowman is the perfect guide to that little-known, life-besotted world, and has fascinating stories to tell about her life in the top story.”
—Diane Ackerman, author of The Zookeeper’s Wife

“This is … More…

"A passionate look at the 'unexplored wonderland' of trees... Lowman shines in her ability to combine accessible science with exciting personal anecdotes that effectively convey the 'thrill of aerial exploration' and bolster her case that trees—and sustainable ecosystems—are worth studying, protecting, and preserving. Nature lovers will find much to consider."
Publishers Weekly

"
The Arbornaut captures the magic of that little-known world with its pioneering stories and clear, informative text. Readers everywhere will be fascinated and inspired to learn more about nature, and especially about how we need to conserve the world’s forests.”
—Jane Goodall, PhD, DBE, founder of the Jane Goodall Institute, and United Nations Messenger of Peace

"The Arbornaut is about a shy girl who loved to play outdoors and became a scientist who educated the world about the abundant life in the treetops. I loved it.”
—Temple Grandin, author of Animals Make Us Human, Animals in Translation, and Thinking in Pictures

The Arbornaut is an eye-opening and enchanting book by one of our major scientist-explorers. Without Meg Lowman, we’d miss so many of the planet’s wonders that just happen to lie out of sight, in a realm we take for granted, ignore, or never knew about to begin with. Lowman is the perfect guide to that little-known, life-besotted world, and has fascinating stories to tell about her life in the top story.”
—Diane Ackerman, author of The Zookeeper’s Wife

“This is the most exciting and innovative way of introducing science that I have seen in many years. Everyone will want to read this book. Meg Lowman is starting a whole new movement exploring the treetops!”
—E. O. Wilson, author of Half-Earth: Our Planet’s Fight for Life

“When Meg Lowman began her exploration of the world of treetops four decades ago, she experienced joy and exhilaration—feelings that come to us in abundance as we turn the pages in her account of this magnificent but still largely unexplored realm. Lowman gives us an exciting, firsthand introduction to some of the things we must come to understand if we are to secure a sustainable future for humanity in these challenging times. A thoroughly enjoyable yet deeply meaningful contribution in every respect!”
—Peter H. Raven, PhD, president emeritus, Missouri Botanical Garden

"The Arbornaut is, true to its name, an account of intrepid exploration at the upper reaches of terrestrial life, where branches and foliage touch the sky and all creatures awake to the first morning rays of the sun.”
—Wade Davis, author of Into the Silence, The Wayfinders, and One River

“In The Arbornaut, Meg Lowman inspires readers with her amazing life story and reminds us that we can’t live without the natural world, especially trees.”
—Tommy Hilfiger

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Meg Lowman; Foreword by Sylvia A. Earle

Meg Lowman, Ph.D., aka “Canopy Meg,” is an American biologist, educator, ecologist, writer, editor, and public speaker. She is the executive director of the TREE Foundation and a professor at the National University of Singapore, Arizona State University, and Universiti Sains Malaysia. Nicknamed the “Real-Life Lorax” by National Geographic and “Einstein of the Treetops” by The Wall Street Journal, Meg Lowman pioneered the science of canopy ecology. Her motto is “no child left indoors.” She travels extensively, conducting research, doing outreach, and speaking to audiences large and small.

image of Meg Lowmano
Carlton Ward

Farrar, Straus and Giroux

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