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The Making of the American Essay

John D'Agata

Graywolf Press

The Making of the American Essay Download image

ISBN10: 1555977340
ISBN13: 9781555977344

Paperback

656 Pages

$25.00

CA$28.99

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For two decades, essayist John D'Agata has been exploring the contours of the essay through a series of innovative, informative, and expansive anthologies that have become foundational texts in the study of the genre. The breakthrough first volume, The Next American Essay, highlighted major work from 1974 to 2003, while the second, The Lost Origins of the Essay, showcased the essay's ancient and international forebears. Now, with The Making of the American Essay, D'Agata concludes his monumental tour of this inexhaustible form, with selections ranging from Anne Bradstreet's secular prayers to Washington Irving's satires, Emily Dickinson's love letters to Kenneth Goldsmith's catalogues, Gertrude Stein's portraits to James Baldwin's and Norman Mailer's meditations on boxing.

Across the anthologies, D'Agata's introductions to each selection-intimate and brilliantly provocative throughout-serve as an extended treatise, collectively forming the backbone of the trilogy. He uncovers new stories in the American essay's past, and shows us that some of the most fiercely daring writers in the American literary canon have turned to the essay in order to produce our culture's most exhilarating art.

The Making of the American Essay offers the essay at its most varied, unique, and imaginative best, proving that the impulse to make essays in America is as old and as original as the nation itself.

Table of Contents
To the Reader

Prologue
Anonymous
Creation

1630
Anne Bradstreet
For My Dear Son Simon Bradstreet

1682
Mary Rowlandson
The Narrative of the Captivity

1741
Jonathan Edwards
Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God

1782
J. Hector St. John
On Snakes; and On the Humming-Bird

1783
Washington Irving
A History of New York

1836
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Nature

1841
Henry David Thoreau
Walking

1851
Herman Melville
The Whiteness of the Whale

1854
Edgar Allan Poe
A Chapter on Autography

1858
Emily Dickinson
To Recipient Unknown

1865
Walt Whitman
The Weather—Does it Sympathize with These Times?

1874
William Carlos Williams
A Matisse

1882

1888
T. S. Eliot
The Dry Salvages

1903
W. E. B. Du Bois
Of the Coming of John

1909
Mark Twain
Letters from the Earth

1917
Kenneth Goldsmith
All the Numbers from Numbers

1921
Jean Toomer
Blood-Burning Moon

1924
Gertrude Stein
If I Told Him: A Complete Portrait of Picasso

1927
Laura Riding Jackson
In a Café

1934
Charles Reznikoff
Testimony: The united States

1936
F. Scott Fitzgerald
The Crack-Up

1939
James Agee
Brooklyn Is

1940
Walter Abish
What Else

1941
E. B. White
Once More to the Lake

1950
John Cage
Lecture on Nothing

1955
Loenard Michaels
In the Fifties

1959
Lillian Ross
The Yellow Bus

1963
Norman Mailer
Ten Thousand Words a Minute

1963
James Baldwin
The Fight: Patterson vs. Liston

1964
Tom Wolfe
The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby

1965
Gay Talese
Frank Sinatra Has a Cold

1968
Williams Gass
In the Heart of the Heart of the Country

1969
N. Scott Momaday
The Way to Rainy Mountain

1970
Joe Brainard
I Remember

1971
Donald Barthelme
Sentence

1972
Susan Steinberg
Signified

1973
Renata Adler
Brownstone

1974
Kathy Acker
Humility

Epilogue
Harryetten Mullen
Elliptical

Reviews

Praise for The Making of the American Essay

"A book worthy of its grand title . . . D’Agata is a fervent guide, providing a preface for almost every piece."—The Columbus Dispatch

“An ambitious project that casts far and wide for exemplary contributions to the essay as a risk-taking work of art.”Lambda Literary

“The concluding volume of D’Agata’s massive trilogy of anthologies on the nonfiction form showcases a remarkable array of writers from Anne Bradstreet to Kathy Acker.”Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel

“John D’Agata has provided a wonderful—and useful—map of the vast territory that is the American essay.”—Lewis Hyde

“D’Agata is America’s most intellectually eloquent reader of the essay . . . With this third and final volume of his long labor of love he gives us a defining work of reference that will serve generations to come.”—Vivian Gornick

“John D’Agata’s anthologies are always stimulating, provocative and full of surprises. Moreover they invaluably extend our notion of what an essay is and can be. This third volume provides the fitting capstone to a brilliant, insanely ambitious endeavor. There are enough nourishing pieces to munch on for years to come.”—Phillip Lopate

“John D’Agata has given our civilization an inexhaustible gift with his three massive compendia of the recent past, the remote past, and the ingenious present and speculative future of the essay. Monumental and intellectually and imaginatively generous, these books are not only absorbing reading but wonderful examples of how, in the right hands, the act of anthologizing becomes an art in its own right.”—Vijay Seshadri

“John D’Agata’s alternative histories of the essay are anthologies in the same way the aurora borealis is actually a bunch of charged collisions; in his books we get to see pieces of art crash against his own restless brilliance. In this third installment, he is once more a stunning curator, giving us the story of the American essay as a strange, nimble creature—vexed and incandescent in its uncertainties, constantly surprising in its negotiations of anguish, mischief, and awe. Here we find ancient varieties of wonder and doubt provisionally fleshed in captivity tales and curiosity cabinets; we find silence and insomnia, blood and swollen moons. This American history is also a history of unknowing itself: a record of the human impulse to metabolize the world and a record of this impulse continually meeting the world’s infinitudes.”—Leslie Jamison

“It’s clear that the past fifteen-or-so years saw a rethinking and a rebirth of the essay, and equally clear that John D’Agata’s work was essential in both. He pushed the form forward with one hand and extended our grasp of its roots with the other. He remains as exciting to read as to argue with, and his hunting in the worlds of lost non-fiction has shown me many new writers and texts.The Making of the American Essay completes a series on the subject and brings the achievement of all three books into focus. It is major.”—John Jeremiah Sullivan

“Please, if the world gets blown to smithereens tomorrow, let this series be the one that tells the next civilization all that we thought and dreamt and said. John D’Agata has done something truly remarkable here: as archivist and archaeologist, as artist and impresario of the purest literary form—the essay—he has left a dazzling record of, as he puts it, ‘our human wondering.’ A New History of the Essay is learned and idiosyncratic, addictive and wildly entertaining. It belongs on every shelf.”—Michael Paterniti

“At last The Making of the American Essay completes John D’Agata’s anthology series, A New History of the Essay. Here the crucial middle years—how we got here—have been filled in, and we can understand anew just how the essay, our American essay, has grown and lived and been written and rewritten. This canon-making is a major undertaking and an astonishing act of literary generosity for which we all should be grateful. As D’Agata puts it, ‘The world, we all know, is already a nonfiction. Let the essay be what we make of it.’ Emphasis on the make—these are the essays we have made, and of these essays we are made—but also on the we. The essay may be a solo thing, but these are songs for all of us to sing.”—Ander Monson

“Nothing could be sweeter than another hugely ambitious and visionary gathering of essays from John D’Agata and Graywolf. In the preceding anthologies I’ve sat in my chair and circled the world, sought out the past, and looked into the future. Now set squarely in America, once again the essay, that most humble and solitary of forms, finds its epic account, rising out of a flood and sweeping toward a horizon of ellipses, a leaving off and a farewell that generously makes room . . . for more . . . more of our voices, more of our shapes, more of our secrets and uncertainties, more of the teeming and inventive energy inside the simplest facts . . . and more of us, reader and writer alike, because in the end this wild and wandering epic is our song to sing.”—Charles D’Ambrosio

“For well over a decade now, John D’Agata has been the renovator-in-chief of the American essay. As practitioner and theorist, writer and anthologist, as example and the enabler of examples, D’Agata has refused to yield to the idea of non-fiction as stable, fixed, already formed. . . . Instead, he has pushed the essay to yield more of itself, to find within itself an enactment of its own etymology—an essaying, a trying, a perpetual attempt at something (after the French verb essayer, to try). He has emphasized that the essay should make, and not merely take; that it should gamble with the fictive and not just trade in the real; that it should entertain uncertainty as often as it hosts opinion; that the essay can be as lyrical, as fragmented, as self-interrupting, and as self-conscious as the most experimental fiction or verse. . . . ‘Let the essay be what we make of it,’ is D’Agata’s refrain, and his three large anthologies have made good on that promise.”—James Wood, from the foreword to A New History of the Essay

“John D’Agata is a groundbreaking literary activist. It is due to him and these anthologies that the most exciting writing today is happening in the realm of nonfiction, in particularly the realm of the essay, which he has, near-single-handedly, rescued from the literary dustbin and turned into a vital contemporary art form. A New History of the Essay is essential reading for anyone interested in the future of nonfiction.”—Heidi Julavits

Reviews from Goodreads

About the author

John D'Agata

John D'Agata is the author of Halls of Fame, About a Mountain, and The Lifespan of a Fact. He teaches creative writing at the University of Iowa, where he serves as the director of the Nonfiction Writing Program.