OVERRIDE

The Book of Intimate Grammar

A Novel

David Grossman; Translated by Betsy Rosenberg

Picador

Aron Kelinfeld is the ringleader among the boys in his Jerusalem neighborhood, but as his 12-year-old friends begin to mature, Aaron remains imprisoned in the body of a child for three long years. While Israel inches toward the Six-Day War, and his friends cross the boundary between childhood and adolescence, Aron remains in his child’s body, spying on the changes that adulthood wreaks as, like his hero Houdini, he struggles to escape the trap of growing up.

BOOK EXCERPTS

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The Book of Intimate Grammar
1Aron is standing on tiptoe for a better view of the street below, where Mama and Papa have just stepped out to breathe some fresh air at the end of a long hot day. They look so small from here. He can taste the dusty metal of the blinds on his lips. His eyes glow. It isn't nice to watch like this. From above. They almost seem like dolls down there, a slow tubby one and a little snippety one. It isn't nice to watch, but it is kind of funny, and kind of scary maybe. The trouble is, Zacky and Gideon see them too. Still, he can't tear himself away. Y'alla, let's go,
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REVIEWS

Praise for The Book of Intimate Grammar

“When the Israeli writer David Grossman’s See Under: Love was published...he was compared legitimately to Kafka, Grass, Márquez and Joyce....David Grossman’s own intimate grammar will speak to anyone who was ever 12.” —The Boston Globe

“Like [Virginia] Woolf, Grossman is uncanny at reproducing an experience from the inside out...the writing reminds you of the great, solemn mystery of literature, what the poet Czeslaw Milosz calls ‘the human possibility of being someone else.’” —Chicago Tribune

“Mr. Grossman’s balance between the poetic and the profane is perfect....[The Book of Intimate Grammar] is See Under: Love’s stylistic twin: the beauty and intelligence of the writing are dazzling....It can be read at once, as a tale of magic realism, a parable about the damage left in the wake of the Holocaust, a psychological portrait of a child’s descent into madness, and, finally, as a comical but searing indictment of the Jewish family.” —The New York Times Book Review
“When the Israeli writer David Grossman’s See Under: Love was published...he was compared legitimately to Kafka, Grass, Márquez and Joyce....David Grossman’s own intimate grammar will speak to anyone who was ever 12.” —The Boston Globe

“Like [Virginia] Woolf, Grossman is uncanny at reproducing an experience from the inside out...the writing reminds you of the great, solemn mystery of literature, what the poet Czeslaw Milosz calls ‘the human possibility of being someone else.’” —Chicago Tribune

“Mr. Grossman’s balance between the poetic and the profane is perfect....[The Book of Intimate Grammar] is See Under: Love’s stylistic twin: the beauty and intelligence of the writing are dazzling....It can be read at once, as a tale of magic realism, a parable about the damage left in the wake of the Holocaust, a psychological portrait of a child’s descent into madness, and, finally, as a comical but searing indictment of the Jewish family.” —The New York Times Book Review

Reviews from Goodreads

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

  • David Grossman; Translated by Betsy Rosenberg

  • David Grossman is the author of two books of journalism, several children's books, a play, and six novels, including Be My Knife. He lives in Jerusalem.
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Available Formats and Book Details

The Book of Intimate Grammar

A Novel

David Grossman; Translated by Betsy Rosenberg

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FROM THE PUBLISHER

Picador

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