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Macmillan Childrens Publishing Group
Them

Them

Why We Hate Each Other--and How to Heal

Ben Sasse

St. Martin's Press

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From the New York Times bestselling author of The Vanishing American Adult, an intimate and urgent assessment of the existential crisis facing our nation.

Our culture has always had tribalism. Different political parties, preferred media outlets, and shifts in positions when politically advantageous. But now our country is facing a far deeper, far more serious existential crisis. We’re reaching a point where we’ve lost faith and trust in the institutions that have held us together. Even more worrisome is that we’ve lost a shared sense of truth. What happens to a nation when half of us believe different facts than the other half?

In Them, bestselling author and U.S. Senator Ben Sasse argues that the problem is far deeper than politics or even any one politician. Across the nation, local communities are evaporating. The basic framework for everyday life — family, work, neighborhoods, friends, trust— is collapsing or, in the case of work, being vastly redefined. Our citizens have become alienated from each other, angry, and lonely.

As our traditional tribes are falling apart, Sasse argues, frustrated and displaced Americans are trying to fill the vacuum with Anti-tribes on social media and cable news, surrounding ourselves with people we already agree with and identifying a common enemy. We are stuck in a loop of loneliness, outrage, and anger.

Sasse offers his own prescription for addressing this challenge, calling for a radical effort to rebuild and remake the institutions that … More…

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Vanishing American Adult, an intimate and urgent assessment of the existential crisis facing our nation.

Our culture has always had tribalism. Different political parties, preferred media outlets, and shifts in positions when politically advantageous. But now our country is facing a far deeper, far more serious existential crisis. We’re reaching a point where we’ve lost faith and trust in the institutions that have held us together. Even more worrisome is that we’ve lost a shared sense of truth. What happens to a nation when half of us believe different facts than the other half?

In Them, bestselling author and U.S. Senator Ben Sasse argues that the problem is far deeper than politics or even any one politician. Across the nation, local communities are evaporating. The basic framework for everyday life — family, work, neighborhoods, friends, trust— is collapsing or, in the case of work, being vastly redefined. Our citizens have become alienated from each other, angry, and lonely.

As our traditional tribes are falling apart, Sasse argues, frustrated and displaced Americans are trying to fill the vacuum with Anti-tribes on social media and cable news, surrounding ourselves with people we already agree with and identifying a common enemy. We are stuck in a loop of loneliness, outrage, and anger.

Sasse offers his own prescription for addressing this challenge, calling for a radical effort to rebuild and remake the institutions that are foundering within communities and a nationwide discussion and understanding of just how monumental this challenge is.

Less…

Ben Sasse

U.S. Senator Ben Sasse is a fifth-generation Nebraskan. The son of a football and wrestling coach, he attended public school in Fremont, Neb., and spent his summers working soybean and corn fields. He was recruited to wrestle at Harvard before attending Oxford and later earning a Ph.D. in American history from Yale. Prior to the Senate, Sasse spent five years as president of Midland University back in his hometown. As perhaps the only commuting family in the U.S. Senate, Ben and his wife, Melissa, live in Nebraska but are homeschooling their three children as they commute weekly back and forth to Washington, DC.

image of Ben Sasseo
Matthew DeBoer

St. Martin's Press

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