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Macmillan Childrens Publishing Group
Dubin's Lives

Dubin's Lives

A Novel

FSG Classics

Bernard Malamud; Introduction by Thomas Mallon

Farrar, Straus and Giroux

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With a new introduction by Thomas Mallon

Dubin's Lives (1979) is a compassionate and wry commedia, a book praised by Christopher Lehmann-Haupt in The New York Times as Malamud's "best novel since The Assistant. Possibly, it is the best he has written of all."

Its protagonist is one of Malamud's finest characters; prize-winning biographer William Dubin, who learns from lives, or thinks he does: those he writes, those he shares, the life he lives. Now in his later middle age, he seeks his own secret self, and the obsession of biography is supplanted by the obsession of love--love for a woman half is age, who has sought an understanding of her life through his books. Dubin's Lives is a rich, subtle book, as well as a moving tale of love and marriage.

Dubin's Lives

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They sometimes met on country roads when there were flowers or snow. Greenfeld wandered on various roads. In winter, bundled up against the weather, Dubin, a five-foot-eleven grizzled man with thin...

Praise for Dubin's Lives

Dubin's Lives, for my money, is certainly Malamud's best novel since The Assistant. Possibly, it is the best he has written of all.” —Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, The New York Times -

Reviews from Goodreads

Bernard Malamud; Introduction by Thomas Mallon

Bernard Malamud (1914-86) wrote eight novels; he won the Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award for The Fixer, and the National Book Award for The Magic Barrel, a collection of stories. Born in Brooklyn, he taught for many years at Bennington College in Vermont.

image of Bernard Malamudo
Copyright Seymour Linden

Bernard Malamud

Farrar, Straus and Giroux

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